Micro interns with macro impact!

The Oxplore team were lucky enough to be joined by three fantastic Oxford University undergraduate students on ‘micro-internships’. These shorter placements are organised by the Internship Office at Oxford University and offer applicants the chance to contribute to a project within a team for a week at the end of term.

We were hugely impressed with the quality, breadth and depth of the work they each produced. Being such a small team, we were able to vastly increase the scope of our project for the week which had a direct and positive impact upon audience reach and engagement.

One of our interns, Molly, focused on creating new digital content for our upcoming Big Question on mental health. She independently organised, filmed and edited a series of short interviews with undergraduate students. Within the videos, students gave their top self-care tips on looking after their personal wellbeing, and they explained on what the concept of mental health meant to them.

Our other two interns, Olivia and Jessy (pictured below), were tasked with organising a Facebook live stream in a week! They approached this daunting prospect with calm professionalism, and pulled together three excellent speakers to discuss and debate the Big Question ‘Should we believe the history books?’

Check out the video here! 

d264c3f3-4527-49aa-9da3-7e9ac2d97f7f

Thoughts from the students

We asked each of the interns to write a reflection on the week that they spent with us- we were thrilled to hear that they all found it useful and enjoyed being a part of the team. We are very grateful for the enthusiasm and energy that they brought to the role, and wish them all the very best in their future careers!

I found my week at Oxplore really exciting and insightful. It was lovely to work in the office alongside so many dedicated people on such a thought provoking and clever piece of Outreach work. One element that I really enjoyed was the freedom of seeing a project through from start to finish. Being able to dedicate the whole week to the live stream and pick our chosen question, create the promotional content and guide the academic discussion gave me lots of new skills in organisation and planning. I particularly enjoyed making the trailer for our live stream and it has encouraged me to put more time into video editing. Now I’ve learned what it is like to focus on outreach full time and how closely intertwined this is with video production and social media, it has shown me that two of my pre-existing interests can meld really well together. I will definitely be getting involved with more work like this in the future – Olivia.

                                                                                        ************

My week with Oxplore has been amazing! I’ve really enjoyed learning more about this platform and the University’s widening participation schemes. It’s been so beneficial to have the opportunity to plan a live stream outreach event from scratch; from choosing the question, thinking ourselves about how we would tackle the question, to gaining skills in event management by finding relevant academics and locations, as well as having to film, edit, and promote videos for the site. This microinternship has been fantastic because of all the different skills involved and subsequently all the experience gained in just 5 days! I hope to use these skills to take digital widening participation back to my College to ensure opportunities are there for students and schools that can’t make it to Oxford for a visit and equally to put a more academic-spin on access. Also, I’ve really loved working full time in outreach every day and hope to be able to do this once I graduate – Jessy.

                                                                                       ************

I have found my week as a micro-intern for Oxplore incredibly interesting and insightful. My passion for creating videos was always merely a hobby, and so I am really thankful for the opportunity to pour all my energy into producing these three videos without any other priorities and distractions. I have learnt about using professional video editing software like After Effects, been taught about different lighting techniques, and discovered what it is like to produce videos as a group. It has been really informative to see what producing videos is like in a professional environment. This experience has encouraged me to pursue more professional opportunities in video production and further develop my own skills in video editing software – Molly. 

Camera

 

Advertisements

How schools are using Oxplore

While Oxplore can and is being used outside of school hours by independent users, encouragement from teachers and use within the classroom can be really instrumental in leading learners to our materials. We can see from our analytics on site use that for UK users, the site is marginally busier between 9am and 3pm – and within those hours it is fairly sustained and consistent use at all times throughout the school day.

We’ve interacted with many teachers in person and online who are excited by the ways they can use the site with their students. We’ve been really inspired by their creative approach to using Oxplore in their schools! Here are just some of the things we’ve heard about already:

Oxplore clubs

This has been a really pleasant surprise for the Oxplore team. We’ve heard that enterprising teachers have set up lunchtime or after school Oxplore clubs for their students. The first we heard about was in Southborough High School, but there are several now dotted across the country. We’ve recently heard that Christ Church College’s Schools Liaison Officer is using them as part of a sustained contact programme with 5 schools in one of their link regions. The clubs take the Big Questions as a starting point for debate and discussion both within individual year groups and across different year groups – making them an excellent space for peer-to-peer learning as well as a variation from the conventional debate club. (Not all of these are called Oxplore clubs – one school calls it Philosopher’s Tea Party which is also pretty charming!)

oxplore club

Capture.PNG

Form time

Some schools are using Oxplore to replace ‘silent reading’ or other form time activities. This does depend on the class having access to either tablets or PCs, or on the teacher taking them through the learning journey. We think this is a great way to start the day! Sleepy Year 10s may disagree…

PSE/Gifted and Talented cohort stretch and challenge

There are many schools who have been in touch to say they are using Oxplore either to include stretch and challenge activities with the whole school through PSE classes to achieve school-wide learning objectives, or to particularly engage with cohorts of those identified by the school are more able/gifted and talented (however or whatever they might define this as). For some schools in our target areas, we recently mailed out some classroom exercises that could inform these – and judging by recent site use and registrations this is being used. Sometimes, we see a number of registrations or comments come through from a certain school in quick succession. Just this morning this happened with a school in Jersey – this afternoon it was Llanidloes in Wales.image2

University preparation

We know of at least one enterprising teacher at a school in Milton Keynes who is using Oxplore as part of a university preparation activity. We’ve been lucky enough to see the PowerPoint she created, but essentially Oxplore is a part of the Y11’s action plan to engage in super-curricular learning that might inform their personal statement or help with subject choice, as well as the basis of a small discussion task.

Oxplore live streams

We held our second school-targetted live stream on the 6 February and schools from across the UK tuned in for discussion and debate around the Big Question ‘Would it be better if we all spoke the same language?’. The classes watching were able to submit questions for the panel and enter a prize draw – and we were glad to hear that some schools were also using the classroom extension activities we designed with their groups either before or after the session. Others reported the discussion going on well after the stream ended! We’re hoping to run another of these in May – and these events will be interspersed with our evening live streams that young people can watch from home.

livestream.PNG

A BETTer day at work

Last week, part of the Oxplore team took some time away from the office to attend BETT at ExCel London. This multi-day expo brought together established companies and new educational technology start-ups for a series of talks, workshops and demos. As a relatively new project ourselves, we were keen to see the latest innovations and how others are using new technology to inform and inspire young people.

For both of us, it was our first visit to BETT and we were overwhelmed by the size of the exhibition area and the diversity of products and approaches on show. Unsurprisingly, Microsoft and Google had large stands, but there were a number of smaller gems including edtech start-ups from across the globe in various government-sponsored stands or tucked away at the corners!

In the exhibition area, we both noted the prevalence of STEM approaches (and in particular anything with a coding element, 3D printing or simple robotics). There were comparatively few Arts and Humanities innovations, except for some language learning apps and VR for experiencing historical times and places. We also didn’t find anything quite like Oxplore. Much of the focus was on encouraging creativity or monitoring progress, rather than stimulating critical thinking (so we aren’t out of the job just yet).

We attended several talks, of which the most interesting and relevant to Oxplore were one from Simon Nelson looking at the future of FutureLearn and the wider digital education offering for the HE sector, and how American teacher Steve Auslander uses the Skype in the Classroom interface to connect his class with experts and other classrooms across the globe.

 

Going Above and Beyond in Wales

In December, the Oxplore team were invited to attend the Seren Network’s conference ‘Above and Beyond’. Seren is a network of regional hubs designed to support Wales’ brightest sixth formers achieve their academic potential, and the conference brought over 1000 of them to Newtown in Mid-Wales.

DQb6JQNUQAAbHkA
Given the sheer number of students, we invited current Oxford students, Joseff and Tamsin, along to lend a hand in delivering workshops and demonstrating the site

We delivered workshops with over 200 Year 12s, and enjoyed seeing how they responded to the tasks we set for them (creating, discussing and presenting their ideas for Big Questions). Being put on the spot – especially when you’ve been travelling in a coach since 6am – can be daunting! Their ideas were creative and their responses astute and considered. Joseff and Tamsin roamed the workshop rooms to challenge their assumptions, and at the end of the sessions the Welsh students submitted their own Questions to us to bring back to Oxford. We put them – all 275 of them – to the Director of Undergraduate Admissions who carefully considered them before choosing 4 to receive prizes from us….

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Bringing the Oxplore concept from Oxford to Wales allows us to spend some time away from our desk and the ongoing task of developing new content and live streams. It also allows us to meet some of the young people we want to encourage to use the site. In our development, feedback was crucial, and even now we’re keen to test the ongoing appeal of the site. On this occasion, 95.2% of those surveyed said they would use oxplore.org after the session – and a modest (well, it was Christmas) increase in pageviews and visit duration from Welsh users bears this through into site usage.

The Oxplore Big Question Challenge!

Want to share your research, inspire young people and have the chance to win a £50 Amazon voucher?

We’re looking for your idea for an engaging Big Question designed to fascinate 11-18 year olds, plus a resource (article, podcast, video, animation, multiple choice quiz, list-style article or image gallery) that you would be keen to create with Oxplore in Trinity Term 2018.

We welcome entries from current DPhil students and early career researchers from any discipline.

To enter, complete our entry form.

Entries must be received by Sunday 11 February 2018

What is Oxplore?

Oxplore is University of Oxford’s digital outreach portal. As the ‘Home of Big Questions’ it aims to engage those from 11 to 18 years old with debates and ideas that go beyond what is covered in the classroom. www.oxplore.org

Oxplore has been built and created by the University of Oxford for young people as part of our commitment to reaching the best students from every kind of background. The project is coordinated by the University’s Widening Access and Participation team which delivers outreach work with young people across the UK as part of Undergraduate Admissions and Outreach.

Our website includes Big Questions ranging from ‘Does a god exist?’ to ‘Is a robot a person?’. Each of these includes tackles complex ideas across a wide range of subjects and draws on the latest research undertaken at Oxford.

cmyk-strap

What is the Oxplore Big Question Challenge?

We’re keen to inspire young people with the latest research happening at Oxford. Part of this means looking for ways to feature interesting approaches to big ideas on our website from our current DPhil students and early career researchers working in a range of disciplines.

This is where you come in! The best idea will not only win you £50 in Amazon vouchers but the opportunity to see it produced and included on the Oxplore site.

You’ll need to suggest a Big Question that can fascinate 11-18 year olds, and one learning resource that could accompany it. The question itself will need to be broad enough to accommodate different arguments and disciplines (you can see examples at www.oxplore.org).

The accompanying learning resource can be more specific to your research expertise but should still be creative and engaging. It could take the form of an article, podcast, video, animation, multiple choice quiz, list-style article or image gallery.

truth edit

How can I enter?

To enter, complete our entry form.

In the first instance, we will be simply asking you to propose your ideas rather than actually send across a finished resource.

How is this judged and when would I find out if I’ve been successful?

Your submission will be judged by a panel of university staff who work in Undergraduate Admissions and Outreach and regularly work with young people. The panel will also include an Access Fellow and the final decision will lie with the Senior Head of Outreach.

The panel will be looking for entries that not only showcase interesting and innovative research and perspectives but that have considered the intended audience and the fit with Oxplore’s existing content types and styles.

Shortlisted entries will be contacted in early March 2018 and will have their entries taken forward in discussion with the Oxplore team and with input from our registered users.

So what makes an engaging Big Question?

An Oxplore ‘Big Question’ is one that can bring in a wide range of disciplines, debates and ideas. It will likely cover areas that are not traditionally covered in the classroom and UK National Curriculum.

An engaging question will not be possible to solve with just one answer. It won’t have a ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ answer. Instead, it will be open to a range of diverse and global perspectives.

It may touch upon an area that thinkers in many disciplines have been debating for years and that still attracts interest today. In this sense, it is continually topical.

An effective big question suggestion will also try to tap into what young people find interesting. From our work with young people, we have found that they are particularly intrigued by ‘the weird and the wonderful’. Topics such as time travel and aliens have attracted interest suggesting they are intrigued by some of the world’s big mysteries and things which test human understanding.

Additionally, some of our most viewed big questions on the site include consideration of gun control and the death penalty indicating the appeal of morbidly curious topics. Just think about the popularity of the Horrible Histories series for example…

Lastly, show that young people are fascinated by questions linked to power and truth such as consideration of whether we can live without laws and whether history books are trustworthy. They also engage well with ideas about the future such as immortality, climate change and more. This is not altogether surprising considering how they are frequently asked to consider what they want to do in their lives.

question-mark-2492009_960_720

I have a question…

Feel free to email oxplore@admin.ox.ac.uk if you have any queries.

In the meantime, good luck and we very much look forward to reading about your ideas!

Happy Holidays from Oxplore

XmasPig3.jpg

As the Oxplore team wind down for 2017, we’ve been reflecting collectively on the past year and everything we have achieved.

This time last year we were about to launch a holding site and were beginning to collate content and bring together our brand assets.

In February, we launched our beta site complete with 15 Big Questions, and took it to the North East to seek user feedback in our first pilot. We tweaked the site content based on that feedback, launched another batch of Big Questions, and went out again to our users in the East Midlands and Wales in May and June for their thoughts on technical features and user experience.

Over the summer, we developed the new features based on their feedback, developed even more Big Questions, and planned for our launch programme to begin in the fresh school year in September.

And, since then, we’ve been working on our next batch of content, building partnerships across the University, launching a programme of live stream events, working with the Seren Network and The Brilliant Club for a large student event in Wales, and launched the various strands of our digital and traditional marketing.

So, in the last year we’ve gone from 0 site users to over 25,000 site users. We’ve gone from 0 Big Questions to 36 Big Questions. Most importantly, we’ve gone from a concept to a dynamic and multi-faceted project.

2017 has certainly been pretty thrilling. We’re all hoping 2018 is just as exciting.

Two, three, four heads are better than one

Here at Oxplore we’re always looking to collaborate with academics across the University since it’s their innovative research and insights that enhance the credibility and richness of our resources.

To date, we have generally asked academics to support Big Questions by contributing to articles and recording podcasts. And this has often been in collaboration with our own team (i.e. we speak to academics over the phone and collate the discussion into a written piece) to streamline the workload and time required of busy academic staff. We also have a panel of early career researchers who academically review the materials on the site and create new resources for us.

New stage, new ways

This model has worked really well. However, now that we have launched nationally and are in a new phase of planning, we’re exploring different ways of working with academics. This includes consulting with key academics to look over new resource plans to gain their insights as to how these could be extended further and how to include lesser-known topics. Not only do we benefit from the fresh perspectives academics offer, but this process also provides another layer of quality assurance for upcoming materials.

We’ve also started to work with academics and create resource plans together from scratch. For example, we are working closely with Dr Priya Atwal on our upcoming Big Question, ‘Do we need a royal family?’ This area lies within her research expertise on the royal family and empire, and so it’s been really valuable to gain her ideas and creative energy in designing this content.

Another way in which we are collaborating with academics is by working with existing interdisciplinary projects based at the University – sharing their materials and helping to create greater awareness of their work among our target audience. For example, we have teamed up with Professor Katrin Kohl who works on the AHRC-funded Creative Multilingualism project to develop our upcoming question: ‘Would it be better if we all spoke the same language?’

Creative multilingualism

Professor Kohl has helped shape and review our resource plans for this question, she has contributed to the main article and she has agreed to take part in our live stream event in February which will be centred on these materials. We’re also excited to be including some of the Creative Multilingualism audio recordings and videos on Oxplore. Plus, the Creative Multilingualism team are keen to use the finished resource in their work with schools, which will not only enhance awareness of both our projects but also Oxford’s outreach activities in general.

Reaching out to the Museums    

Since the start of Oxplore, we’ve been keen to work together with the University museums, gardens and libraries to share some of their beautiful collections and highlight their interesting projects. Much to our delight, we’ve been able to draw upon the collections for some of our homepage images. See some examples below:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Additionally, when we were planning a Big Question about sexuality (‘Does it matter who you love?), we knew instantly that we wanted to try and involve the superb ‘Out in Oxford’ project which brings together items from the University collections that focus on LGBTQ+ experience. With permission from museum staff, we created two shortened trails for the Oxplore site using the original images and descriptions as provided by University staff and students. This served as a meaningful way to bring in a historical, anthropological and global perspective to the exploration of this topic.

The journey continues…

We’re always looking for new ways to include and work with academic staff. Next year we’re planning to run a competition whereby we invite early career researchers to share their research in an engaging way with our young target audience. If you’re an academic or work with academics and have a suggestion for how you would like to contribute to Oxplore, please do get in touch as it would be great to hear from you.